image

Books » Applications (English)

Oil Export Economies. New Comparative Perspectives on the Arab Gulf States

image

Annika Kropf
2016
Gerlach Press

Despite their commonalities, the Arab Gulf States have started economic diversification from different settings and against different political backgrounds. This book applies a multi-method approach including Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) to highlight their heterogeneous economic development trajectories and to compare them to other major oil exporters. From a political economy perspective, it demonstrates how neoclassical economic theory fails to grasp the underlying mechanisms of their development. The research design of this study is tailored to small and medium-sized samples with special characteristics. As such, it offers new opportunities for comparative studies not only of this region but also of other specific samples of countries from a wider perspective of heterodox economics.

For more information, see the book's website at Gerlach Press.

EU Treaties and the Judicial Politics of National Courts: A Law and Politics Approach

image

Pablo José Castillo Ortiz
2016
Routledge

Cases such as the Maastricht ruling by the German Federal Constitutional Court or the 'Crotty; decision by the Irish Supreme Court have gone down in the history of European integration as outstanding examples of intervention by judicial actors in important political processes. In this book, Dr. Castillo Ortiz makes for the first time a comprehensive analysis of all such rulings by national higher courts on European Union treaties issued during their processes of ratification.

Using an interdisciplinary Law and Politics approach and a sophisticated methodological strategy, the book describes the political dynamics underlying some of the most relevant judicial episodes in the process of European Integration during the last decades: litigation strategies by Europhile and Eurosceptic actors, relations between the judiciary and the other branches of government, and clashes of power between national courts and the European Court of Justice of the European Union. By offering empirical evidence and by relying on scientific rigor, the book seeks to provide both experts and the general public an accessible account of one of the most salient but least studied aspects of current European law and politics.

For more information, see the book's website at Taylor & Francis.

Young People's Educational Careers in England and Germany: Integrating Survey and Interview Analysis via Qualitative Comparative Analysis

image

Judith Glaesser
2015
Palgrave Macmillan

Through a comparative study of young people's educational careers in England and Germany, this book explores the range of influences which shape educational careers such as the individual talents and interests of young people, their social class and background, as well as school and country characteristics. Methodologically, the book develops a mixed methods approach that utilises Charles Ragin's increasingly popular Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) to examine cross-case analyses of secondary survey data alongside within-case process-tracing analyses of interview data to establish causal understanding of educational careers. International comparison adds another dimension, exploiting the significant differences between the two countries' school and university systems. The book therefore offers both a contemporary account of young people's educational careers and decision-making as well as a practical contribution to ongoing debates concerning the establishment of causal and explanatory knowledge in the non-experimental social sciences.

For more information, see the book's website at Palgrave Macmillan.

Democratic Participation in Armed Conflict: Military Involvement in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq

image

Patrick Mello
2014
Palgrave Macmillan

When do democracies participate in military operations, and under which conditions do they abstain? Studies on the democratic peace have largely neglected the flipside of democratic participation in armed conflict. Moreover, whilst scholars have made the case that democracy needs to be unpacked to be meaningful, this is rarely done in international relations. In comparative politics, on the other hand, there has been extensive research on democratic subtypes and their virtues and weaknesses, but this is seldom applied to security policy. In this book, Mello provides a unique theoretical framework that integrates various explanatory approaches for a systematic comparative analysis of the conditions for democratic war involvement. Drawing on a novel methodological approach, this book identifies pathways of military participation and abstention across thirty democracies and their (non-)involvement in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq.

For more information, see the book's website at Palgrave Macmillan.

Peace Negotiations and Time: Deadline Diplomacy in Territorial Disputes

image

Marco Pinfari
2013
Routledge

This book discusses the role of time in peace negotiations and peace processes in the post-Cold War period, making reference to real-world negotiations and using comparative data. Deadlines are increasingly used by mediators to spur deadlocked negotiation processes, under the assumption that fixed time limits tend to favour pragmatism. Yet, little attention is typically paid to the durability of agreements concluded in these conditions, and research in experimental psychology suggests that time pressure can have a negative impact on individual and collective decision-making by reducing each side's ability to deal with complex issues, complex inter-group dynamics and inter-cultural relations.

This volume explores this lacuna in current research through a comparative model that includes 68 episodes of negotiation and then, more in detail, in relation to four cases studies - the Bougainville and Casamance peace processes, and the Dayton and Camp David proximity talks. The case studies reveal that in certain conditions low time pressure can impact positively on the durability of agreements by making possible effective intra-rebel agreements before official negotiations, and that time pressure works in proximity talks only when applied to solving circumscribed deadlocks.

This book will be of much interest to students of peace processes, conflict resolution, negotiation, diplomacy and international relations in general.

For more information, see the book's website at Routledge.

Putting Social Movements in their Place: Explaining Opposition to Energy Projects in the United States, 2000-2005

image

Doug McAdam and Hilary Schaffer Boudet
2012
Cambridge University Press

The field of social movement studies has expanded dramatically over the past three decades. But as it has done so, its focus has become increasingly narrow and 'movement-centric'. When combined with the tendency to select successful struggles for study, the conceptual and methodological conventions of the field conduce to a decidedly Ptolemaic view of social movements: one that exaggerates the frequency and causal significance of movements as a form of politics. This book reports the results of a comparative study, not of movements, but of communities earmarked for environmentally risky energy projects. In stark contrast to the central thrust of the social movement literature, the authors find that the overall level of emergent opposition to the projects has been very low, and they seek to explain that variation and the impact, if any, it had on the ultimate fate of the proposed projects.

For more information, see the book's website at Cambridge University Press.

On Baltic Slovenia and Adriatic Lithuania: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis of Patterns in Post-Communist Transformation

image

Zenonas Norkus
2012
Apostrofa/Central European University Press

A unique application of social science software to generate typology and ranklist of transition models of twenty-nine countries in Europe and Asia, ranging from Estonia to Vietnam, Norkus provides a highly innovative internationally comparative causal analysis of the variation in political and economic outcomes after the first decade of post-communist transformations, using multi-value Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Tosmana programme. The analysis includes a critical revision of received dichotomies (e.g. on gradualism versus "shock therapy"), and contributes to current debates on the varieties of post-communist capitalism.

For more information, see the book's website at CEU Press.

Coercing, Constraining and Signalling Explaining UN and EU Sanctions After the Cold War

image

Francesco Giumelli
2011
ECPR Press

The costs of military ventures and concern for human rights have increased the importance of international sanctions in the twenty-first century, but our knowledge is still limited in this area. The United Nations sanctions on Libya, Al Qaeda and Rwanda, or the European Union restrictive measures on the US, Transnistria and Uzbekistan are sparsely covered by the media and attempts to measure the effectiveness of any of these sanctions comes up against the fundamental (unanswered) question: What can sanctions do and when? This book enhances our understanding of how sanctions work and explains what we can expect from their imposition. Through analysis of the sanctioning experience of the UN and EU after the Cold War, the investigation tests a comprehensive theoretical model and concludes that the context in which sanctions are imposed is crucial in deciding the type of sanctions adopted.

For more information, see the book's website at ECPR Press.

The EU as International Environmental Negotiator

image

Tom Delreux
2011
Ashgate

Delreux examines how the EU functions when it participates in international environmental negotiations. In particular, this book looks at the internal EU decision-making process with regard to international negotiations that lead to multilateral environmental agreements. By studying eight such decision-making processes, the book analyses how much negotiation autonomy (or 'discretion') the EU negotiator (the European Commission or the Council Presidency) enjoys vis-à-vis the member states it represents and how this particular degree of discretion can be explained. The book's empirical evidence is based on extensive literature review, primary and semi-confidential document research, as well as interviews with EU decision-makers. It is aimed at a readership interested in EU politics and decision-making, global/multilateral governance, environmental policy science and methodological development of Qualitative Comparative Analysis.

For more information, see the book's website at Ashgate.

Vulnerable Daughters in India: Culture, Development and Changing Contexts

image

Mattias Larsen
2010
Routledge

Underlying the widespread problem of sex-selective abortions in India is the puzzling fact that daughters have become vulnerable in a time of general improvement in welfare, female status and dramatic economic and social changes. The findings in this book are centred on a contradiction between the continued importance of the cultural factors which for so long have established that a son is necessary, and socioeconomic changes that are challenging the foundations for these very factors. This contradiction entails an uncertainty over sons fulfilling expectations which has - instead of titling the balance in favour of daughters - increased the relative importance of sons and intensified negative consequences for daughters.

Based on original research, this book studies the use of sexselective abortions to discriminate against daughters and focuses on the reasons behind it. It takes its starting point in the fact that declining child sex ratios are a result of an ongoing process of societal change in India, and addresses a nationwide social pattern and problem. Its deliberate focus on the dynamics of the problem and its connection to development and change sets it apart from other studies on gender imbalance and sex ratios in India, and opens up new avenues to examine the problem. It will therefore be of interest to researchers and students in gender studies, development studies, sociology and social policy, as well as policy-makers, advisors, planners and activists.

For more information, see the book's website at Routledge.

The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Information Technology and Political Islam

image

Philip N. Howard
2010
Oxford University Press

Around the developing world, political leaders face a dilemma: the very information and communication technologies that boost economic fortunes also undermine power structures. Globally, one in ten internet users is a Muslim living in a populous Muslim community. In these countries, young people are developing their political identities- including a transnational Muslim identity-online. In countries where political parties are illegal, the internet is the only infrastructure for democratic discourse. And in countries with large Muslim communities, mobile phones and the internet are helping civil society build systems of political communication independent of the state and beyond easy manipulation by cultural or religious elites. The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy looks at the role that communications technologies play in advancing democratic transitions in Muslim countries. As such, its central question is whether technology holds the potential to substantially enhance democracy. Certainly, no democratic transition has occurred solely because of the internet. But, as Philip Howard argues, no democratic transition can occur today without the internet. According to Howard, the major (and perhaps only meaningful) forum for civic debate in most Muslim countries today is online. Drawing upon material from interviews with telecommunications policy makers and activists in Azerbaijan, Egypt, Tajikistan and Tanzania and a comparative study of 74 countries with large Muslim populations, Howard demonstrates that these forums have been the means to organize activist movements that have lead to successful democratic insurgencies.

For more information, see the book's website at Oxford University Press.

Colonialism and Postcolonialism Development: Spanish America in Comparative Perspective

image

James Mahoney
2010
Cambridge University Press

In this comparative-historical analysis of Spanish America, Mahoney offers a new theory of colonialism and postcolonial development. He explores why certain kinds of societies are subject to certain kinds of colonialism and why these forms of colonialism give rise to countries with differing levels of economic prosperity and social well-being. Mahoney contends that differences in the extent of colonialism are best explained by the potentially evolving fit between the institutions of the colonizing nation and those of the colonized society. Moreover, he shows how institutions forged under colonialism bring countries to relative levels of development that may prove remarkably enduring in the postcolonial period. The argument is sure to stir discussion and debate, both among experts on Spanish America who believe that development is not tightly bound by the colonial past, and among scholars of colonialism who suggest that the institutional identity of the colonizing nation is of little consequence.

For more information, see the book's website at Cambridge University Press.

Politics of Risk-Taking: Welfare State Reform in Advanced Democracies

image

Barbara Vis
2010
Amsterdam University Press

How much and in which direction have the welfare states among the Western democracies changed over the past decades? Moreover, under which conditions have governments enacted these changes? Based on insights from prospect theory, a psychological theory of choice under risk, Vis demonstrates ably that the context in which governments find themselves (losses or gains) affects their attitude towards risk and thereby the degree and type of reform they pursue. Facing socio-economic losses or political ones, governments accept the electoral risk involved in unpopular reforms, such as benefit cutbacks; confronting gains, they steer away from them. The study's new theoretical stance and innovative methodological approach (fuzzy-set analysis) make Politics of Risk-Taking a must read for policymakers, scholars as well as students interested in the politics of welfare state reform.

For more information, see the book's website at Amsterdam University Press.

The Consolidation of Democracy: Comparing Europe and Latin America

image

Carsten Q. Schneider
2008
Routledge

This book investigates the successes and failures in consolidating those democratic regimes that emerged in Europe and Latin America in the last quarter of the 20th century. Reinterpreting conventional claims, Schneider's comparative analyses of 32 countries indicate that the driving force behind the Consolidation of Democracy (CoD) is the fit between the institutional type of democracy and the societal context in terms of power dispersion.

In order to develop the argument that CoD is the result of equifinal, conjunctural, and asymmetric conditions, this book discusses some general methodological issues involved when investigating causally complex claims in (macro-) comparative social research. By employing an innovative two-step fuzzy-set QCA approach, Schneider provides one of the first book-length applications of fsQCA to real data and demonstrates that this approach can be a valuable addition to the methodological tool kit of comparative social scientists. This important volume will be of interest to political scientists, particularly those with an interest in democracy, democratization, comparative methodology, and configurational comparative methods.

For more information, see the book's website at Routledge.


compasss.org© - Page last modified 23.01.2016 19:54:36